Power Up Your Commitment to Sustainability – World Earth Hour - Salt 106.5

Power Up Your Commitment to Sustainability – World Earth Hour

WWF Australia is inviting Aussies to switch off and get active in nature to power up their commitment to a sustainable future.

By Salt 106.5 Network Friday 1 Mar 2024Health and WellbeingReading Time: 3 minutes

Earth Hour is a grassroots movement which began in Sydney in 2007. Best known for its “lights out” challenge, this year Aussies are also encouraged to get outdoors and do an activity of their choice every day for 60 minutes in the lead up to Earth Hour on 23 March.

Key points:

  • Aussies are being encouraged to get outdoors for 60 minutes daily in the lead up to Earth Hour.
  • Australia has the highest rate of mammal extinction on the planet.
  • Earth Hour is the world’s biggest grassroots movement.

“Earth Hour has grown into the world’s biggest grass root movement to protect our planet,” says Rachael Lance, Head of Individual Giving at WWF-Australia.

“Historically known for its signature lights out moment, where millions of people and landmarks around the world switch off their lights in support of stronger action on climate change and biodiversity, landmarks will still be switching off for Earth Hour this year but we’re also encouraging Aussies to make an impact beyond the hour by taking part in a new initiative called Challenge 60.

“From March 1st until Earth Hour on March 23rd, we’re challenging people to get out in nature and walk, run, swim, cycle for 60 minutes a day and raise funds to regenerate nature.

“The funds raised will drive critical conservation projects that help protect our wildlife and the planet.”

Landmarks will still be switching off for Earth Hour this year.

Research conducted by WWF Australia has revealed that we’re spending less time outdoors.

“30% of the Aussies surveyed admit their time spent outdoors has decreased by up to 50% in the past year,” Rachael says and explains that this has been linked to due to mindlessly scrolling our phones, heading back into the office full time and having a jam-packed social calendar.

“That’s one of the reasons we’ve launched a new challenge to encourage people to get active in nature for Earth Hour this year.”

We’re known around the world for our diversity of flora and fauna but sadly, our wildlife is suffering.

“Our precious wildlife and wild places are on a really tragic trajectory and need us to urgently take action,” Rachael says.

Climate change and nature lovers are two of the biggest threats facing people and wildlife here in Australia, with bushfires, floods and mass coral bleaching events taking their toll, among many other factors.

“We also have the highest mammal extinction rate in the world and our list of threatened species continues to grow.

“Our precious wildlife and wild places are on a really tragic trajectory and need us to urgently take action.”

The community-led movement is known for its signature “lights out” moment, with millions of people and landmarks around the world switching off their lights in support of stronger action on climate change and biodiversity loss. Landmarks will still be switching off for Earth Hour this year, with the addition of Challenge 60, a more personal challenge available to help individuals become more active and aware.

“We’d love for as many Aussies as possible to join us in switching off and getting active in nature to power up their commitment to a sustainable future,” Rachael says.

Register for Challenge 60 at earthhour.org.au. 


Feature image: Photo by CanvaPro